Stand in Support of Musicians!

From the AFL-CIO

Members of the American Federation of Musicians (AFM) are fighting to secure a fair contract with major Hollywood film and TV companies. AFM members perform in every genre of music and perform live for programs like "The Tonight Show," and play the soundtracks for our most beloved TV shows and movies.

Musicians’ livelihoods are under attack by greedy corporations determined to gut their wages. Like actors, directors and writers, musicians traditionally earn most of their wages as deferred income in the form of residuals. Among the most intransigent of these employers is The Walt Disney Company—the same company that has brought so much joy to so many, is refusing to pay its workers a fair wage.

The primary issue in bargaining is that AFM is seeking a residual payment on “made for new media” content, i.e., those shows and movies that go directly to streaming services. As more content moves to streaming services, this is absolutely necessary in order to secure musicians’ ability to work in this field in the long term. Variety magazine quoted one longtime AFM member as saying, “Our ability to make a sustainable living is facing extinction.”

Independent research has shown that a musician in the United States loses about 75% of their income on work that is made for new media compared to typical theatrical and TV work. As Disney prepares to invest up to $25 billion in its Disney Plus streaming service, musicians suffer. Nearly every other unionized Hollywood workforce (writers, actors, directors, etc.) share in the profits, why can’t musicians?

A 75% pay cut is never right!

For more information, please visit: BandTogetherAFM.org.

Posted In: Union Matters

Union Matters

Get to Know AFL-CIO's Affiliates: National Association of Letter Carriers

From the AFL-CIO

Next up in our series that takes a deeper look at each of our affiliates is the National Association of Letter Carriers.

Name of Union: National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC)

Mission: To unite fraternally all city letter carriers employed by the U.S. Postal Service for their mutual benefit; to obtain and secure rights as employees of the USPS and to strive at all times to promote the safety and the welfare of every member; to strive for the constant improvement of the Postal Service; and for other purposes. NALC is a single-craft union and is the sole collective-bargaining agent for city letter carriers.

Current Leadership of Union: Fredric V. Rolando serves as president of NALC, after being sworn in as the union's 18th president in 2009. Rolando began his career as a letter carrier in 1978 in South Miami before moving to Sarasota in 1984. He was elected president of Branch 2148 in 1988 and served in that role until 1999. In the ensuing years, he worked in various roles for NALC before winning his election as a national officer in 2002, when he was elected director of city delivery. In 2006, he won election as executive vice president. Rolando was re-elected as NALC president in 2010, 2014 and 2018.

Brian Renfroe serves as executive vice president, Lew Drass as vice president, Nicole Rhine as secretary-treasurer, Paul Barner as assistant secretary-treasurer, Christopher Jackson as director of city delivery, Manuel L. Peralta Jr. as director of safety and health, Dan Toth as director of retired members, Stephanie Stewart as director of the Health Benefit Plan and James W. “Jim” Yates as director of life insurance.

Number of Members: 291,000 active and retired letter carriers.

Members Work As: City letter carriers.

Industries Represented: The United States Postal Service.

History: In 1794, the first letter carriers were appointed by Congress as the implementation of the new U.S. Constitution was being put into effect. By the time of the Civil War, free delivery of city mail was established and letter carriers successfully concluded a campaign for the eight-hour workday in 1888. The next year, letter carriers came together in Milwaukee and the National Association of Letter Carriers was formed.

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There is Dignity in All Work

There is Dignity in All Work