Oops: Trump admitted he blew up the infrastructure deal, not Democrats

Josh Israel

Josh Israel Senior Investigative Reporter, Think Progress

President Donald Trump blew up talks with congressional Democratic leaders on Wednesday, vowing that he would not do anything to address America’s crumbling infrastructure — an issue he has repeatedly cited as a chance for bipartisan cooperation — until Congress stopped doing oversight of his administration.

Trump met with Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) on Wednesday morning, ostensibly to discuss a path forward on legislation to rebuild roads and bridges. Last month, the trio had agreed to the outlines of a $2 trillion infrastructure spending plan. But with congressional Republicans and his own advisers reportedly objecting to the cost, it quickly became apparent that Trump had little intention to actually reach an agreement at this meeting.

Minutes after the meeting, Trump appeared in the White House Rose Garden and announced that he was angry that his campaign’s Russian ties and his repeated attempts to obstruct investigations are still being scrutinized even after he (falsely) declared himself totally exonerated by special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation.

He admitted at the podium he was the one to scuttle infrastructure talks before they even began.

“So, I just wanted to let you know that I walked into the room and I told Sen. Schumer, Speaker Pelosi: ‘I wanna do infrastructure. I wanna do it more than you want to do it. I’d be really good at that, that’s what I do. But you know what, you can’t do it under these circumstances. So get these phony investigations over with,'” he told reporters.

“Let them play their games. We’ll go down one track at a time. Let them finish up and we’ll be all set,” Trump added.

Trump delivered this announcement in front of a printed sign that repeated his false mantra that the Mueller investigation found no collusion and no obstruction and was run by “18 Angry Democrats.” It also repeated the false claim that the investigation cost more than $35 million, though in reality it brought in more in asset forfeitures than it cost, including $22 million in real estate once belonging to Paul Manafort.

In a press conference after Trump’s speech, Schumer pointed out Trump’s behavior on Wednesday proved that the plan to talk was little more than a charade on the president’s part. “[N]ow that he was forced to actually say how he’d pay for it, he had to run away,” the New York Democrat explained. He noted that the press conference was obviously “not a spontaneous move on the president’s part. It was planned.”

“When we got in the room, the curtains were closed, the president — there was a place for him at the front, so he could stand and attempt to tell us why he wouldn’t do infrastructure,” Schumer recounted, “And of course, then he went to the Rose Garden with prepared signs that had been printed up long before our meeting.”

Pelosi also noted that this was the second excuse Trump had given in 24 hours as to why he could not address the nation’s infrastructure. “Last night he put forth a letter saying that unless we passed the U.S./Mexico/Canada free trade agreement, there was no reason for us to, you know, we couldn’t go forward with infrastructure.”

Trump did not explain why Congress could not pass legislation while it also did its constitutionally mandated oversight work. He showed little interest in passing an infrastructure package during the first two years of his administration, while Republicans controlled both houses of Congress. His administration’s announced “infrastructure week” roll-outs were cancelled so many times that it became a national joke.

In June 2015, Trump promised that if elected president, he would rebuild the country’s infrastructure. “Nobody can do that like me,” he said, “Believe me. It will be done on time, on budget, way below cost, way below what anyone ever thought.” Four years later, it seems unlikely that Trump will deliver on what he once called the “the next generation of roads, bridges, railways and tunnels, and seaports and airports, that believe me, folks, is what our country deserves.”

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Reposted from ThinkProgress

Josh Israel is a senior investigative reporter for ThinkProgress.org at the Center for American Progress Action Fund. Previously, he was a reporter and oversaw money-in-politics reporting at the Center for Public Integrity, was chief researcher for Nick Kotz’s acclaimed 2005 book Judgment Days: Lyndon Baines Johnson, Martin Luther King Jr., and the Laws that Changed America, and was president of the Virginia Partisans Gay & Lesbian Democratic Club. A New England-native, Josh received a B.A. in politics from Brandeis University and graduated from the Sorensen Institute for Political Leadership at the University of Virginia, in 2004. He has appeared on CNBC, Bloomberg, Fox News, Current TV, and many radio shows across the country.

Posted In: Allied Approaches

Union Matters

The Big Drip

From the USW

From tumbledown bridges to decrepit roads and failing water systems, crumbling infrastructure undermines America’s safety and prosperity. In coming weeks, Union Matters will delve into this neglect and the urgent need for a rebuilding campaign that creates jobs, fuels economic growth and revitalizes communities. 

A rash of water main breaks in West Berkeley, Calif., and neighboring cities last month flooded streets and left at least 300 residents without water. Routine pressure adjustments in response to water demand likely caused more than a dozen pipes, some made of clay and more than 100 years old, to rupture.

West Berkeley’s brittle mains are not unique. Decades of neglect left aging pipes susceptible to breaks in communities across the U.S., wasting two trillion gallons of treated water each year as these systems near collapse.

Comprehensive upgrades to the nation’s crumbling water systems would stanch the flow and ensure all Americans have reliable access to clean water.

Nationwide, water main breaks increased 27 percent between 2012 and 2018, according to a Utah State University study.  

These breaks not only lead to service disruptions  but also flood out roads, topple trees and cause illness when drinking water becomes contaminated with bacteria.

The American Water Works Association estimated it will cost at least $1 trillion over the next 25 years to upgrade and expand water infrastructure.

Some local water utilities raised their rates to pay for system improvements, but that just hurts poor consumers who can’t pay the higher bills.

And while Congress allocates money for loans that utilities can use to fix portions of their deteriorating systems, that’s merely a drop in the bucket—a fraction of what agencies need for lasting improvements.

America can no longer afford a piecemeal approach to a systemic nationwide crisis. A major, sustained federal commitment to fixing aging pipes and treatment plants would create millions of construction-related jobs while ensuring all Americans have safe, affordable drinking water.

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There is Dignity in All Work