We Need More Senators Who Support Workers Like Senator Jon Tester

By Matt Murray
NH Labor News

This week, Democratic Senator Jon Tester of Montana, submitted new legislation in support of workers who have been locked out by their employer.

In August, French-owned Imerys’ locked out workers at their plant in Three Forks. Workers are members of the Boilermakers union (IBB) and have been fighting back against the lockout for three months now.  This is the first lockout in Montana in over 35 years.

According to the AFL-CIO, “the lockout comes after Imerys consistently has refused to back down from its anti-worker contract proposal. The proposed contract would eliminate retiree health insurance, seniority, overtime over eight hours, double-time pay for overtime and the current defined contribution 401(k) plan, and would freeze the defined pension plan.”

Last month, Tester rallied with workers locked and vowed to take legislative action in the U.S. Senate.

Tester’s bill, the Prohibiting Incentives for Corporations that Kickout Employees Tax (PICKET) Act, will eliminate tax breaks, deductions, and credits for corporations that lock out their workers during a labor dispute.

“When corporations sell their workers downstream, they shouldn’t be able to turn around and cash in on the backs of taxpayers,” Tester said. “Imerys is a multinational, billion-dollar foreign corporation that has shown no interest in our Montana values and this bill will hold them accountable for unnecessarily upending the lives of workers and their families.”

Tester’s bill will specifically require corporations who lock out workers during a labor dispute to pay the old corporate tax rate of 35 percent, rather than the new rate of 21 percent for the entire taxable year.

Tester’s bill also will prevent these corporations from deducting wages and benefits paid to any temporary workers during the lockout and prevent the corporation from receiving certain tax credits for hiring replacement workers.

The PICKET Act applies to all U.S. corporations and U.S.-based subsidiaries of foreign corporations like Imerys. Tester’s bill is available HERE.

We need all of our US Senators to join Senator Tester in holding these greedy corporations accountable.  We need to stop rewarding them for locking workers out.

***

Reposted from NH Labor News

Posted In: Allied Approaches

Union Matters

Get to Know AFL-CIO's Affiliates: National Association of Letter Carriers

From the AFL-CIO

Next up in our series that takes a deeper look at each of our affiliates is the National Association of Letter Carriers.

Name of Union: National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC)

Mission: To unite fraternally all city letter carriers employed by the U.S. Postal Service for their mutual benefit; to obtain and secure rights as employees of the USPS and to strive at all times to promote the safety and the welfare of every member; to strive for the constant improvement of the Postal Service; and for other purposes. NALC is a single-craft union and is the sole collective-bargaining agent for city letter carriers.

Current Leadership of Union: Fredric V. Rolando serves as president of NALC, after being sworn in as the union's 18th president in 2009. Rolando began his career as a letter carrier in 1978 in South Miami before moving to Sarasota in 1984. He was elected president of Branch 2148 in 1988 and served in that role until 1999. In the ensuing years, he worked in various roles for NALC before winning his election as a national officer in 2002, when he was elected director of city delivery. In 2006, he won election as executive vice president. Rolando was re-elected as NALC president in 2010, 2014 and 2018.

Brian Renfroe serves as executive vice president, Lew Drass as vice president, Nicole Rhine as secretary-treasurer, Paul Barner as assistant secretary-treasurer, Christopher Jackson as director of city delivery, Manuel L. Peralta Jr. as director of safety and health, Dan Toth as director of retired members, Stephanie Stewart as director of the Health Benefit Plan and James W. “Jim” Yates as director of life insurance.

Number of Members: 291,000 active and retired letter carriers.

Members Work As: City letter carriers.

Industries Represented: The United States Postal Service.

History: In 1794, the first letter carriers were appointed by Congress as the implementation of the new U.S. Constitution was being put into effect. By the time of the Civil War, free delivery of city mail was established and letter carriers successfully concluded a campaign for the eight-hour workday in 1888. The next year, letter carriers came together in Milwaukee and the National Association of Letter Carriers was formed.

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There is Dignity in All Work

There is Dignity in All Work