No More Wall Street Giveaways

By the AFL-CIO

Every single challenge faced by working people can be traced back to the greed of powerful corporations and CEOs, which is why America’s leaders should be holding Wall Street accountable, not weakening consumer protections and opening the door to risky banking practices and predatory lending.

Working people call on our elected leaders to oppose legislation from Sen. Mike Crapo (R-Idaho) to roll back and eliminate sections of the 2010 Dodd–Frank Act. Congress should be building on that landmark law so working families and our communities can thrive.


The bill from Sen. Crapo to roll back or end some banking regulations is bipartisan corporate welfare, and working families will not stand for it.

Every single challenge working people face, from trade to wages to retirement security and infrastructure, has made Wall Street richer and Main Street poorer.  

Politicians who says they support working families should vote NO on this bad Crapo bill.

Congress should be tightening regulations on Wall Street, strengthening consumer protections and doing everything in its power to ensure Wall Street is the servant of Main Street, not the other way around.

The focus of America’s independent labor movement is always on creating a fair, equitable and good economy, so working people and our communities can enjoy broadly shared prosperity.  

Posted In: Union Matters

Union Matters

America’s Wealthy: Ever Eager to Pay Their Taxes!

Sam Pizzigati

Sam Pizzigati Editor, Too Much online magazine

Why do many of the wealthiest people in America oppose a “wealth tax,” an annual levy on grand fortune? Could their distaste reflect a simple reluctance to pay their fair tax share? Oh no, JPMorganChase CEO Jamie Dimon recently told the Business Roundtable: “I know a lot of wealthy people who would be happy to pay more in taxes; they just think it’ll be wasted and be given to interest groups and stuff like that.” Could Dimon have in mind the interest group he knows best, Wall Street? In the 2008 financial crisis, federal bailouts kept the banking industry from imploding. JPMorgan alone, notes the ProPublica Bailout Tracker, collected $25 billion worth of federal largesse, an act of generosity that’s helped Dimon lock down a $1.5-billion personal fortune. Under the Elizabeth Warren wealth tax plan, Dimon would pay an annual 3 percent tax on that much net worth. Fortunes between $1 billion and $2.5 billion would face a 5 percent annual tax under the Bernie Sanders plan.

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No Such Thing as Good Greed

No Such Thing as Good Greed