Corporations, not workers, are receiving the greatest benefits from GOP tax bill

Rebekah Entralgo

Rebekah Entralgo Reporter, ThinkProgress

Four months after Republicans in Congress passed the largest tax code overhaul in three decades, American corporations have gotten a huge tax cut.

New analysis from Americans for Tax Fairness, however, suggests these corporations aren’t using their recently freed up cash to help middle class workers like the administration said it would — more than 84 times.

The organization analyzed corporate data from primarily Fortune 500 companies, whose revenues are two-thirds of the entire gross domestic product (GDP), in addition to news reports and independent analyses of top U.S. companies. What they found was that these powerful corporations have spent a total of roughly $238,244,348,330 in stock buybacks since December 20, 2017 when the tax bill passed.

Working class Americans won’t see a penny of that.

Stock buybacks help those who own corporate stock, which typically means the already-rich. The wealthiest 10 percent of American households own 84 percent of all shares, while the top 1 percent own 40 percen. Roughly one-half of American households don’t own stock at all.

According to the data, few corporations have decided to use the savings from the tax bill to benefit their workers directly. Out of the over 1,500 companies from which Americans for Tax Fairness collected data, just 359 of them actually promised to increase wages for their employees. Of those that have, the majority only offered a bump of $15 an hour in entry-level pay — which, by all accounts, should already be what companies pay entry-level employees in a tightening labor market.

And those one-time tax bill bonuses corporations gave out to employees? Those represent just a just small fraction of what the $1.4 trillion dollar tax bill costs. A ThinkProgress analysis of the bonuses, originally compiled by Americans for Tax Reform, found that they total roughly $981 million — only .09 percent of the total cost of the corporate tax cut.

Overall, only 2 percent of Americans have reported getting a raise or bonus as a result of the tax bill.

In hindsight, this kind of data isn’t surprising, given that CEOs were openly admitting to journalists that they planned to spend their tax windfall on everything but their workers.

“Is it our goal to increase return to our shareholders and do we have an excess amount of capital? The answer to both is, yes,” Wells Fargo CEO Tim Sloan told CNN Money on December 18, one day prior to the tax bill’s passage. “So our expectation should be that we will continue to increase our dividend and our share buybacks next year and the year after that and the year after that.”

White House chief economic adviser Gary Cohn also attended a Wall Street Journal event in November, where CEOs were asked whether their companies planned to invest more in their workforce if the tax reform bill passed. Very few hands went up.

Corporations and the ultra-wealthy are not the only ones who will be seeing huge returns as a result of the GOP tax bill: according to a new report from the Center For American Progress Action Fund (ThinkProgress is an editorially independent news site housed at CAPAF), 15 Republicans from tax writing committees in Congress will also receive an average tax windfall of $314,000 from the legislation they helped craft.

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Reposted from Think Progress

Posted In: Allied Approaches

Union Matters

Get to Know AFL-CIO's Affiliates: National Association of Letter Carriers

From the AFL-CIO

Next up in our series that takes a deeper look at each of our affiliates is the National Association of Letter Carriers.

Name of Union: National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC)

Mission: To unite fraternally all city letter carriers employed by the U.S. Postal Service for their mutual benefit; to obtain and secure rights as employees of the USPS and to strive at all times to promote the safety and the welfare of every member; to strive for the constant improvement of the Postal Service; and for other purposes. NALC is a single-craft union and is the sole collective-bargaining agent for city letter carriers.

Current Leadership of Union: Fredric V. Rolando serves as president of NALC, after being sworn in as the union's 18th president in 2009. Rolando began his career as a letter carrier in 1978 in South Miami before moving to Sarasota in 1984. He was elected president of Branch 2148 in 1988 and served in that role until 1999. In the ensuing years, he worked in various roles for NALC before winning his election as a national officer in 2002, when he was elected director of city delivery. In 2006, he won election as executive vice president. Rolando was re-elected as NALC president in 2010, 2014 and 2018.

Brian Renfroe serves as executive vice president, Lew Drass as vice president, Nicole Rhine as secretary-treasurer, Paul Barner as assistant secretary-treasurer, Christopher Jackson as director of city delivery, Manuel L. Peralta Jr. as director of safety and health, Dan Toth as director of retired members, Stephanie Stewart as director of the Health Benefit Plan and James W. “Jim” Yates as director of life insurance.

Number of Members: 291,000 active and retired letter carriers.

Members Work As: City letter carriers.

Industries Represented: The United States Postal Service.

History: In 1794, the first letter carriers were appointed by Congress as the implementation of the new U.S. Constitution was being put into effect. By the time of the Civil War, free delivery of city mail was established and letter carriers successfully concluded a campaign for the eight-hour workday in 1888. The next year, letter carriers came together in Milwaukee and the National Association of Letter Carriers was formed.

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There is Dignity in All Work

There is Dignity in All Work