A Broken Immigration System

From the AFL-CIO

After a week of family separation, workplace raids and even more bad legislation, it is clearer than ever that we must fix our broken immigration system.

“The Trump administration is using enforcement overreach to terrify immigrant workers and is directly threatening our freedom to stand together and fight in unions for fair pay and treatment,” said AFL‑CIO President Richard Trumka.  

Trumka added: “Nothing embodies our broken immigration system more than the unnecessary pain and suffering of our immigrant brothers and sisters as families are torn apart at the border.”

America’s broken immigration system and threats of detention and deportation have been used as leverage to lower pay, worsen benefits and make workplaces less safe for decades.

The brutal policy of ripping children from the arms of parents at America’s borders adds a new low to this legacy.

A first priority of any nation must be to safeguard families and our most vulnerable people, especially those who come here seeking safety and refuge.

Necessary, too, are good jobs and the freedom to stand together in unity to raise pay and lift up our communities.

Working people want real solutions, not the two bad bills put forward by Congress, because both choke off legal immigration, expand abusive temporary work visa programs, and fail to protect families and children.

The AFL‑CIO demands comprehensive immigration reform with a path to citizenship and an end to a system that hurts working people.

Sixty nine percent of participants in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, commonly known as DACA, got a higher-paying job because of work authorization, said a survey from the Center for American Progress. The results illustrate the way good immigration policy can raise pay.

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Posted In: From AFL-CIO, Union Matters

Union Matters

Home Health Care Workers Under Attack

By Bethany Swanson
USW Intern

Home health care workers have important but difficult jobs that require them to work long hours and chaotic schedules to care for the country’s rapidly growing elder population.

Instead of protecting these workers, the vast majority of whom are women and people of color, the current administration plans to make it harder for them to belong to unions, stifling their best chance for improving working conditions and wages.

The anti-union measure would roll back an Obama-era rule that allows home care workers, whose services are paid for through Medicaid, to choose to have their union dues deducted directly from their paychecks.

The goal of the rule, like the recent Janus decision and other anti-union campaigns, is to starve unions out of existence, so they can no longer protect their members.

Home health care workers bathe, dress, feed and monitor the health of the sick and elderly, but they often cannot afford to provide for their own families.

On average, they make little more than $10 an hour and more than half rely on some sort of public assistance. Most receive few or no benefits, even though home care workers and other direct care workers have some of the highest injury rates of any occupation.

That’s why many home care workers have turned to labor unions.

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The Dirty Truth about Janus

The Dirty Truth about Janus