Trump’s own staff has no idea what Donald Trump is talking about

Justin Salhini

Justin Salhini Reporter, Think Progress

President Donald Trump’s baseless Twitter proclamation that his phones were tapped before the election by the Obama administration has drawn reaction from both sides of the aisle on Saturday, including from President Obama’s spokesman.

A number of Democrats responded to Trump on Twitter, including House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), who repeated a call for an independent investigation into the administration’s ties to Russia.

Several other Democratic lawmakers criticized Trump’s tweet with notable reactions coming from Ben Rhodes, a former adviser to Obama, former Vermont Gov. and DNC Chairman Howard Dean, and Rep. Ted Lieu (D-CA). Rhodes pointed out that a president cannot order a wiretap, while Dean and Lieu suggested Trump’s accusations mean a federal judge found probable cause to monitor the Trump campaign’s communications.

The sentiment was also expressed by Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-NY).

On the Republican side, Sen. Lindsay Graham (R-SC) said he was “very worried” about Trump’s claim.

On the Republican side, Sen. Lindsay Graham (R-SC) said he was “very worried” about Trump’s claim.

“I’m very worried that our president is suggesting the former president has done something illegal,” Graham said at a town hall in Clemson, S.C., according to the Hill.

“I’d be very worried if in fact the Obama administration was able to obtain a warrant lawfully about Trump campaign activity with foreign governments. It’s my job as United States senator to get to the bottom of this.”

Former and current intelligence officials also spoke to the press about Trump’s proclamations, and were uniformly dumbfounded by the accusation. One former official told CNN Trump’s claims were outright false.

Current officials say Trump didn’t consult staff before tweeting this morning, and have no clue what the President of the United States is talking about.

Meanwhile, Trump is golfing.

Posted In: Allied Approaches

Union Matters

Failing Bridges Hold Public Hostage

From the USW

From tumbledown bridges to decrepit roads and failing water systems, crumbling infrastructure undermines America’s safety and prosperity. In coming weeks, Union Matters will delve into this neglect and the urgent need for a rebuilding campaign that creates jobs, fuels economic growth and revitalizes communities.

The Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) gave the public just a few hours’ notice before closing a major bridge in March, citing significant safety concerns.

The West Seattle Bridge functioned as an essential component of  the city’s local and regional transportation network, carrying 125,000 travelers a day while serving Seattle’s critical maritime and freight industries. Closing it was a huge blow to the city and its citizens. 

Yet neither Seattle’s struggle with bridge maintenance nor the inconvenience now facing the city’s motorists is unusual. Decades of neglect left bridges across the country crumbling or near collapse, requiring a massive investment to keep traffic flowing safely.

When they opened it in 1984, officials predicted the West Seattle Bridge would last 75 years.

But in 2013, cracks started appearing in the center span’s box girders, the main horizontal support beams below the roadway. These cracks spread 2 feet in a little more than two weeks, prompting the bridge’s closure.

And it’s still at risk of falling.  

The city set up an emergency alert system so those in the “fall zone” could be quickly evacuated if the bridge deteriorates to the point of collapse.

More than one-third of U.S. bridges similarly need repair work or replacement, a reminder of America’s urgent need to invest in long-ignored infrastructure.

Fixing or replacing America’s bridges wouldn’t just keep Americans moving. It would also provide millions of family-supporting jobs for steel and cement workers, while also boosting the building trades and other industries.

With bridges across the country close to failure and millions unemployed, America needs a major infrastructure campaign now more than ever.

 

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There is Dignity in All Work

There is Dignity in All Work