The Majority of Non-Union Professionals Support Unionization

Even as the overall rate of union membership decreases each year, the same cannot be said for actual support of unions even among those who don’t wear a blue collar.

A recent national survey sponsored by the AFL-CIO’s Department of Professional Employees (DPE) found that the majority of non-union professionals support the idea of union representation in their workplaces.

The survey was conducted in October 2016, and poll takers interviewed 1,004 professional employees who are not currently represented by a labor union.  Over half of these workers said that they would support a union in their workplace and that union representation would improve their salaries as well as their health and retirement benefits.

Well, hot damn! Workers want to be treated with dignity? You don’t say!

“Most professionals want and deserve a raise,” DPE President Paul Almeida stated regarding the survey’s findings. “Professionals realize that by coming together in union they can earn better pay, benefits, and working conditions.”

Even among those 441 workers surveyed who did not voice support for a union in their workplace, the dissent was not strong, and the majority of them admitted to not knowing much about unions and the benefits they provide. This opens up opportunity for labor activists to bring these folks over into the light as blue collar jobs become scarce and as industries such as technology and healthcare rise up with an educated work force.

“By providing more information about the advantages of a collective voice and demonstrating success through improving wages and benefits, union organizers can overcome many of the concerns disapprovers have about unions,” Almeida said.

Posted In: Union Matters

Union Matters

A Billionaire with a Truly Bottom-Line Moral Code

Sam Pizzigati

Sam Pizzigati Editor, Too Much online magazine

Some advice for billionaire investment fund manager Tom Barrack: Don’t give any more lectures on morality. Last Tuesday, this long-time Donald Trump pal — and chairman of his inauguration — did a bit too much moralizing. Speaking in Abu Dhabi, Barrack called the hand-wringing over Saudi crown prince Mohammed bin Salman’s role in the savage murder of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi “a mistake.” After all, he noted, “we have a young man and a regime that’s trying to push themselves into 2030.” We ought not, Barrack added, try “to dictate” the Saudi “moral code.” The pushback would be quick and massive. On Wednesday, Barrack apologized, but didn’t, news reports noted, “retract praise for the crown prince.” One possible reason: Barrack’s investment fund has tanked of late, its share price down by over half. Barrack has raised over $1.5 billion in bailout aid from Saudi Arabia and the UAE. He may be hoping for still more.

***

More ...

Let's Talk About Wealth

Let's Talk About Wealth