Building Pride in American Made

Sarah Calhoun

Sarah Calhoun Founder, Red Ants Pants

In a time of uncertain economies, I can’t help but think about how we as Americans can take more control into our own hands. 

Hard work, fine craftsmanship, and innovation were some of the values this nation was built upon. In recent decades, we are seeing more and more manufacturers outsource production overseas. This move is typically driven by profit margins.

Keeping our manufacturing on U.S. soil not only creates jobs and strengthens our business relationships and local economies, but it does something else that may be even more important.

It helps build pride. Pride in our work and in our craftsmanship, pride in our working neighborhoods, and pride in ourselves.

Manufacturing helped build this nation in our early years, and building pride in America is something that could perhaps help to unify this nation today.

Perhaps nowhere else can our dollars have a multiplying effect like they do when we support made in America manufacturing. Estimates show that every dollar invested in U.S. manufacturing generates $1.81 in economic activity.

In other words, when you purchase goods Made in the U.S.A., each dollar nearly doubles the investment into the American economy. One manufacturing employee is estimated to support 3.4 jobs in other sectors. In addition, it’s estimated that every $1 in value-added output in manufacturing has a net $3.60 added economic impact. American manufacturing kicked out $5.3 trillion in goods last year alone contributing to more of the nation’s economic output than mining, construction and transportation combined.

Some days I wonder if I were truly cut out for capitalism as I don’t like pushing products.  But when we can weave values into our products, and pride into our communities, then heck yeah, I’m a capitalist. 

It’s the American Dream after all.

We have choices with every dollar we spend. Our money speaks. 

This holiday season, let’s hear it for pride in American Made. 

For American-made holiday gift ideas, check out the 2017 Made in America Holiday Gift Guide.

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Reposted from AAM

Posted In: Allied Approaches, From Alliance for American Manufacturing

Union Matters

Get to Know AFL-CIO's Affiliates: National Association of Letter Carriers

From the AFL-CIO

Next up in our series that takes a deeper look at each of our affiliates is the National Association of Letter Carriers.

Name of Union: National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC)

Mission: To unite fraternally all city letter carriers employed by the U.S. Postal Service for their mutual benefit; to obtain and secure rights as employees of the USPS and to strive at all times to promote the safety and the welfare of every member; to strive for the constant improvement of the Postal Service; and for other purposes. NALC is a single-craft union and is the sole collective-bargaining agent for city letter carriers.

Current Leadership of Union: Fredric V. Rolando serves as president of NALC, after being sworn in as the union's 18th president in 2009. Rolando began his career as a letter carrier in 1978 in South Miami before moving to Sarasota in 1984. He was elected president of Branch 2148 in 1988 and served in that role until 1999. In the ensuing years, he worked in various roles for NALC before winning his election as a national officer in 2002, when he was elected director of city delivery. In 2006, he won election as executive vice president. Rolando was re-elected as NALC president in 2010, 2014 and 2018.

Brian Renfroe serves as executive vice president, Lew Drass as vice president, Nicole Rhine as secretary-treasurer, Paul Barner as assistant secretary-treasurer, Christopher Jackson as director of city delivery, Manuel L. Peralta Jr. as director of safety and health, Dan Toth as director of retired members, Stephanie Stewart as director of the Health Benefit Plan and James W. “Jim” Yates as director of life insurance.

Number of Members: 291,000 active and retired letter carriers.

Members Work As: City letter carriers.

Industries Represented: The United States Postal Service.

History: In 1794, the first letter carriers were appointed by Congress as the implementation of the new U.S. Constitution was being put into effect. By the time of the Civil War, free delivery of city mail was established and letter carriers successfully concluded a campaign for the eight-hour workday in 1888. The next year, letter carriers came together in Milwaukee and the National Association of Letter Carriers was formed.

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There is Dignity in All Work

There is Dignity in All Work