How to Find Union-Made Tires

The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) has made it very easy to find union-made tires by requiring that each tire carry a code that shows the company and the location of the plant that manufactured the tire. DOT requires that each tire sold in the United States carry a code that looks something like this: DOT BE XX XXX XXX. The two letters or numbers that follow the DOT identify a particular factory as listed below.

  • BE: B.F. Goodrich, Tuscaloosa, Ala.
  • BF: B.F. Goodrich, Woodburn, Ind.
  • VE, YE, YU, 8B: Bridgestone/Firestone, Des Moines, Iowa
  • D2, E3, W1, Y7: Bridgestone/Firestone, La Vergne, Tenn.
  • 2C, 4D, 5D: Bridgestone/Firestone, Morrison, Tenn.
  • UP: Cooper, Findlay, Ohio
  • UT: Cooper, Texarkana, Ark.
  • JU, PC, UK: Goodyear, Medicine Hat, Alberta
  • JJ, MD, PU: Goodyear, Gadsden, Ala.
  • DA: Dunlop, Buffalo, N.Y.
  • JN, MJ, PY: Goodyear, Topeka, Kan.
  • JE, MC, PT: Goodyear, Danville, Va.
  • JF, MM, PJ: Kelly-Springfield, Fayetteville, N.C.
  • CF: Titan Tire, Des Moines
  • JH, MN, PK: Titan Tire, Freeport, Ill.
  • B plus serial #: Titan Tire, Bryan, Ohio
  • CC: Yokohama Tire, Salem, Va.

All tires made at the above locations are made by members of the United Steelworkers (USW). Make sure you use this easy-to-follow guide to buy union-made tires.

Want more union made products? Text MADE to 235246 (standard data and message rates may apply).

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This has been reposted from the AFL-CIO.

Posted In: From AFL-CIO, Allied Approaches

Union Matters

America’s Wealthy: Ever Eager to Pay Their Taxes!

Sam Pizzigati

Sam Pizzigati Editor, Too Much online magazine

Why do many of the wealthiest people in America oppose a “wealth tax,” an annual levy on grand fortune? Could their distaste reflect a simple reluctance to pay their fair tax share? Oh no, JPMorganChase CEO Jamie Dimon recently told the Business Roundtable: “I know a lot of wealthy people who would be happy to pay more in taxes; they just think it’ll be wasted and be given to interest groups and stuff like that.” Could Dimon have in mind the interest group he knows best, Wall Street? In the 2008 financial crisis, federal bailouts kept the banking industry from imploding. JPMorgan alone, notes the ProPublica Bailout Tracker, collected $25 billion worth of federal largesse, an act of generosity that’s helped Dimon lock down a $1.5-billion personal fortune. Under the Elizabeth Warren wealth tax plan, Dimon would pay an annual 3 percent tax on that much net worth. Fortunes between $1 billion and $2.5 billion would face a 5 percent annual tax under the Bernie Sanders plan.

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No Such Thing as Good Greed

No Such Thing as Good Greed