How to Find Union-Made Tires

The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) has made it very easy to find union-made tires by requiring that each tire carry a code that shows the company and the location of the plant that manufactured the tire. DOT requires that each tire sold in the United States carry a code that looks something like this: DOT BE XX XXX XXX. The two letters or numbers that follow the DOT identify a particular factory as listed below.

  • BE: B.F. Goodrich, Tuscaloosa, Ala.
  • BF: B.F. Goodrich, Woodburn, Ind.
  • VE, YE, YU, 8B: Bridgestone/Firestone, Des Moines, Iowa
  • D2, E3, W1, Y7: Bridgestone/Firestone, La Vergne, Tenn.
  • 2C, 4D, 5D: Bridgestone/Firestone, Morrison, Tenn.
  • UP: Cooper, Findlay, Ohio
  • UT: Cooper, Texarkana, Ark.
  • JU, PC, UK: Goodyear, Medicine Hat, Alberta
  • JJ, MD, PU: Goodyear, Gadsden, Ala.
  • DA: Dunlop, Buffalo, N.Y.
  • JN, MJ, PY: Goodyear, Topeka, Kan.
  • JE, MC, PT: Goodyear, Danville, Va.
  • JF, MM, PJ: Kelly-Springfield, Fayetteville, N.C.
  • CF: Titan Tire, Des Moines
  • JH, MN, PK: Titan Tire, Freeport, Ill.
  • B plus serial #: Titan Tire, Bryan, Ohio
  • CC: Yokohama Tire, Salem, Va.

All tires made at the above locations are made by members of the United Steelworkers (USW). Make sure you use this easy-to-follow guide to buy union-made tires.

Want more union made products? Text MADE to 235246 (standard data and message rates may apply).

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This has been reposted from the AFL-CIO.

Posted In: From AFL-CIO, Allied Approaches

Union Matters

A Just, Inclusive and Sustainable Economy

From the AFL-CIO

This week, labor leaders from across the country descended on New Orleans to map out the path ahead for our movement. From trade and public education to equal pay and paid leave to back pay for federal contract workers and bargaining power for all, the AFL-CIO Executive Council tackled the issues that will define working people’s fight for economic justice in 2019 and beyond.

Sending waves through Washington yesterday, the Executive Council’s most notable decision was its announcement that, “if the administration insists on a premature vote on the new NAFTA in its current form, we will have no choice but to oppose it.” Here are a few highlights from the statement:

  • Trade policy must be judged by whether it leads to a just, inclusive and sustainable economy....By that measure, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which has driven the outsourcing of so many good jobs, has been a catastrophic failure. More than 850,000 U.S. jobs were shipped overseas under NAFTA between 1993 and 2013.
  • By design, NAFTA distorted power relationships in favor of global employers over workers, weakened worker bargaining power and encouraged the de-industrialization of the U.S. economy.
  • After a quarter-century of this race to the bottom, workers in all three NAFTA countries find it more difficult to form unions and negotiate collective bargaining agreements.
  • The NAFTA renegotiation requires strong labor rights provisions and strong enforcement provisions that as of today are not yet in the agreement.
  • The current effort by the business community to pass the new NAFTA is premature, and if it continues, we will be forced to mobilize to defeat it, just as we mobilized to kill the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

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New NAFTA Must Create an Economy for All

New NAFTA Must Create an Economy for All