What’s Going On With GM?

Matthew McMullan

Matthew McMullan Communications Manager, Alliance for American Manufacturing

In 2017, Congressional Republicans passed and President Trump signed what the Washington Post described as “the most significant overhaul of the U.S. tax code in 30 years.”

 
Paul Ryan@SpeakerRyan
 

When I was chair of @HouseBudgetGOP, we began to change the debate with the Roadmap for America’s Future. Now, all these years later, those early ideas of tax reform have become law and hundreds of millions of Americans are better for it.

Less than a year later, a flagship American corporation, General Motors -- proud recipent of approximately $50 billion in federal assistance after the Great Recession -- took its reduced corporate tax rate and announced plant closures in Ohio, Michigan and Maryland. Lots of layoffs. If only we had seen it coming! 

 
NowThis@nowthisnews
 

This tax expert warned Congress that the GOP tax bill could lead to outsourcing. GM just announced more than 14,000 U.S. layoffs

Oh man! Maybe the president should have read that tax bill he signed a little more closely.

Anyway: After GM caught a ton of heat for its downsizing plans it deigned to offer laid-off workers the opportunity to move into other positions at factories elsewhere.

Mary Barra@mtbarra
 

I understand how GM’s recent news is affecting our colleagues, families and communities. Our focus remains on helping employees…

But the United Autoworkers, which represents workers in GM factories, is claiming the company is instead filling those positions with temps. That's a savvy business move by GM; you don’t have to extend to temps benefits like health insurance.

So what’s the buzz about GM today? Crunching the numbers to see if domestic manufacturing jobs can be saved? A close scrutiny of whether shareholder-servicing isn't the best way to run a company? Nope, the buzz is this:

Bloomberg@business
 

Should General Motors scrap its name? Morgan Stanley says maybe https://bloom.bg/2CVmBs7 

 

Should General Motors Scrap Its Name? Morgan Stanley Says Maybe

General Motors Co. management may want to contemplate a name change to get investors thinking differently about the more than century-old company that’s trying to transform itself.

bloomberg.com

Yes, that's right: “General Motors Co. management may want to contemplate a name change to get investors thinking differently about the more than century-old company that’s trying to transform itself,” reads the opening paragraph in a Bloomberg story.

Talk about misaligned priorities. The layoffs will take effect in March.

***

Reposted from AAM

Posted In: Allied Approaches, From Alliance for American Manufacturing

Union Matters

Steel for Wind Power

From the USW

From tumbledown bridges to decrepit roads and failing water systems, crumbling infrastructure undermines America’s safety and prosperity. In coming weeks, Union Matters will delve into this neglect and the urgent need for a rebuilding campaign that creates jobs, fuels economic growth and revitalizes communities. 

Siemens Gamesa last month laid off 130 workers at its turbine blade manufacturing plant in Iowa, just months after GE Renewable Energy decided to close an Arkansas factory and eliminate 470 jobs.

The companies reported shrinking demand for their products, even though U.S. consumption of wind energy increases every year.

America’s prosperity depends not only on harnessing this crucial energy source but also ensuring that highly skilled U.S. workers build the components with the cleanest technology available.

Right now, the nation relies on imported steel and turbine components from foreign manufacturers like China while America’s own steel industry—well equipped for this production—struggles because of dumping and other unfair trade practices.

Steel makes up the bulk of turbine hubs and the wind towers themselves. It’s also used to make the cranes and platforms necessary for installing the towers.

Yet the potential boon to America’s steel industry is just one reason to ramp up domestic production of wind energy infrastructure.

American steel production ranks among the cleanest in the world, while China has the highest carbon emissions of any steelmaking nation and flouts environmental regulations.

The nation’s highly-skilled steelmaking workforce must play an essential role in the deeply-needed revitalization and modernization of the nation’s failing infrastructure. Producing the components for harnessing wind energy domestically and cleanly is an important step that will put Americans to work and position the United States to be world leaders in this growing industry.

 

More ...

There is Dignity in All Work

There is Dignity in All Work