Shutdown Stories

From the USW

In Ohio, our members at Maxion, a wheel manufacturer, are facing an onslaught of dumped and subsidized steel wheels from China. Because of the shutdown impacts at the International Trade Commission, the trade case that can get them some relief is delayed.

Similarly, 300 USW-represented workers at Tyler Pipe in Texas are seeing their jobs threatened by unfair trade. A pending trade case could help them out, but with the shutdown, a delay and continued imports only further jeopardize their jobs and the company’s viability.
 

Are you or your family impacted
by the shutdown? Let us know.


Every day the government shutdown drags on, 800,000 federal workers remain in limbo wondering when they’ll get their next paycheck. That includes 250,000 veterans and many fellow union members. The indirect impacts, such as those happening to the Steelworkers in the stories above, are piling up. With nearly 80 percent of Americans reporting that they live paycheck to paycheck, it does not take long for financial challenges to become overwhelming and lasting.

Goverrnment workers and those who depend upon their work should not be pawns in a policy debate far-removed from the day-to-day of their jobs. If politicians want to have a debate about the wall or border security, they should do it while the government is open. We urge Congress to get them back to work before more damage is done.

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Posted In: Union Matters

Union Matters

Steel for Wind Power

From the USW

From tumbledown bridges to decrepit roads and failing water systems, crumbling infrastructure undermines America’s safety and prosperity. In coming weeks, Union Matters will delve into this neglect and the urgent need for a rebuilding campaign that creates jobs, fuels economic growth and revitalizes communities. 

Siemens Gamesa last month laid off 130 workers at its turbine blade manufacturing plant in Iowa, just months after GE Renewable Energy decided to close an Arkansas factory and eliminate 470 jobs.

The companies reported shrinking demand for their products, even though U.S. consumption of wind energy increases every year.

America’s prosperity depends not only on harnessing this crucial energy source but also ensuring that highly skilled U.S. workers build the components with the cleanest technology available.

Right now, the nation relies on imported steel and turbine components from foreign manufacturers like China while America’s own steel industry—well equipped for this production—struggles because of dumping and other unfair trade practices.

Steel makes up the bulk of turbine hubs and the wind towers themselves. It’s also used to make the cranes and platforms necessary for installing the towers.

Yet the potential boon to America’s steel industry is just one reason to ramp up domestic production of wind energy infrastructure.

American steel production ranks among the cleanest in the world, while China has the highest carbon emissions of any steelmaking nation and flouts environmental regulations.

The nation’s highly-skilled steelmaking workforce must play an essential role in the deeply-needed revitalization and modernization of the nation’s failing infrastructure. Producing the components for harnessing wind energy domestically and cleanly is an important step that will put Americans to work and position the United States to be world leaders in this growing industry.

 

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There is Dignity in All Work

There is Dignity in All Work