No Trump-Xi Meeting Ahead of Tariff Truce Deadline

Cathalijne Adams

Cathalijne Adams Researcher/Writer, AAM

During his State of the Union speech this week, President Donald Trump declared that any new trade deal with China must include “real, structural change to end unfair trade practices, reduce our chronic trade deficit, and protect American jobs.” It looks like he meant it.

Trump said on Thursday that he does not plan to meet Chinese President Xi Jinping this month, withdrawing his earlier far more optimistic comment that he would indeed meet Xi before the March 2 conclusion of the tariff truce.  

This reversal suggests that Trump is disinclined to seek a quick and easy solution to trade negotiations and neglect the broader, more deeply embedded canker of U.S.-China trade talks – the Chinese government’s flagrant disregard for fair trade practices.

As Alliance for American Manufacturing President Scott Paul writes in RealClearPolitics:

“The Trump administration should be seeking measurable improvements to China’s industrial policies so that those policies don’t tacitly encourage economic espionage or serve as release valves for Beijing’s intentional industrial overcapacities. It should maintain those tariffs and a strict enforcement regimen to hold China’s attention.”

With news of Trump’s postponement of a meeting with Xi, there’s hope yet that the Trump administration remains attuned to the true goal of the trade negotiations when U.S. representatives meet with their Chinese counterparts in Beijing this week.

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Reposted from AAM

Posted In: Allied Approaches, From Alliance for American Manufacturing

Union Matters

Steel for Wind Power

From the USW

From tumbledown bridges to decrepit roads and failing water systems, crumbling infrastructure undermines America’s safety and prosperity. In coming weeks, Union Matters will delve into this neglect and the urgent need for a rebuilding campaign that creates jobs, fuels economic growth and revitalizes communities. 

Siemens Gamesa last month laid off 130 workers at its turbine blade manufacturing plant in Iowa, just months after GE Renewable Energy decided to close an Arkansas factory and eliminate 470 jobs.

The companies reported shrinking demand for their products, even though U.S. consumption of wind energy increases every year.

America’s prosperity depends not only on harnessing this crucial energy source but also ensuring that highly skilled U.S. workers build the components with the cleanest technology available.

Right now, the nation relies on imported steel and turbine components from foreign manufacturers like China while America’s own steel industry—well equipped for this production—struggles because of dumping and other unfair trade practices.

Steel makes up the bulk of turbine hubs and the wind towers themselves. It’s also used to make the cranes and platforms necessary for installing the towers.

Yet the potential boon to America’s steel industry is just one reason to ramp up domestic production of wind energy infrastructure.

American steel production ranks among the cleanest in the world, while China has the highest carbon emissions of any steelmaking nation and flouts environmental regulations.

The nation’s highly-skilled steelmaking workforce must play an essential role in the deeply-needed revitalization and modernization of the nation’s failing infrastructure. Producing the components for harnessing wind energy domestically and cleanly is an important step that will put Americans to work and position the United States to be world leaders in this growing industry.

 

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There is Dignity in All Work

There is Dignity in All Work