Zinke is officially rolling back offshore oil and gas production safety rules

Kyla Mandel

Kyla Mandel Associate Editor, Think Progress

Safety rules for the oil and gas industry introduced after the BP Deepwater Horizon disaster are officially being rolled back by the Trump administration.

In a notice that will appear in the Federal Register Friday, the Department of Interior removes or revises certain rules focusing on safety requirements during the time an oil platform is producing oil and gas (as opposed to the drilling process).

Removing these regulations will help boost fossil fuel production, the notice explains.

“This rule,” it states, “supports the Administration’s objective of facilitating energy dominance by encouraging increased domestic oil and gas production and reducing unnecessary burdens on stakeholders, while ensuring safety and environmental protection.”

The rule change removes the mandate that independent third parties certify safety devices ensuring effective operations in extreme conditions. Instead, oil company employees will now be allowed to examine these devices themselves.

Companies will also no longer be required to notify the Interior’s Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) of “false alarms” that may come from safety equipment sensors. Companies will also only be required to inform officials when initial production of oil and gas begins at the site, rather than every subsequent time production starts.

This set of rules was not the main regulation introduced under the Obama administration after the Deepwater Horizon disaster, which killed 11 people and spilled millions of barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. However, there have also been proposals to weaken parts of the central regulation, the Well Control Rule, as well.

The Interior’s notice comes from an administration pushing to expand offshore drilling along the country’s coastline — something the majority of local leaders oppose.

The news also comes shortly after the department announced it would auction off 78 million acres of the Gulf of Mexico for further oil and gas extraction. And at a conference earlier this month, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke reportedly told the oil and gas industry “the government should work for you.”

The BSEE in a statement said that it incorporates the industry’s “best science and best practices…to ensure safety and environmental sustainability.”

But, reacting to the news, the director of the Sierra Club’s lands protection program, Athan Manuel, stated, “Nothing could be more reckless than seeking to expose more of our coasts to the risks of drilling while simultaneously increasing those risks by rolling back commonsense safety standards designed to protect workers and the environment from disasters like Deepwater Horizon.”

Posted In: Allied Approaches

Union Matters

Labor Wins

From the AFL-CIO

On Tuesday, the labor movement drove historic wins for pro-worker candidates like Governor-Elect Andy Beshear in Kentucky and new legislative majorities in Virginia. Not only did union members come out to vote in droves, 270 union member candidates were elected to public office last night and counting. This adds to the total of more than 900 union members elected up and down the ballot in last year’s midterms, a product of the Union Member Candidate Program launched by the AFL-CIO just two years ago. The share of union members who won in the 2018 midterms is two-thirds. The program will continue through 2020 and beyond, electing even more union members to public office. 

“Our efforts recruiting, training and supporting labor candidates have led to the passage of pro-worker legislation from coast to coast and everywhere in between,” AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka said.

***

More ...

There is Dignity in All Work

There is Dignity in All Work