A Dark Corporate Web

From the AFL-CIO

Corporate CEOs and the wealthy elite hope a ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court in the case of Janus v. AFSCME, Council 31, will bleed America’s labor unions of precious resources that help fight for working people.

A bad decision that limits or eliminates fair share fees will further stack the deck in favor of the wealthy few, but America’s working people aren’t waiting on any politician or judge to decide our fate. We’re building a movement to write new economic rules to create broadly shared prosperity.

The Supreme Court will soon issue a decision in Janus v. AFSCME, Council 31, which is part of a multipronged attack on the freedoms of working people by the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation, a front group funded by corporate billionaires.

On paper, the case was brought by Mark Janus, an Illinois state employee, against his union, which empowers him and his co-workers to negotiate for higher wages and better benefits and is legally required to represent him if he is mistreated by his employer.

But in reality, Janus has been driven entirely by a dark web of corporations and wealthy donors who want to destroy unions and silence working people.

IIn anticipation of a ruling from the Supreme Court that undermines working people, the billionaire Koch brothers and the owners of Walmart have dumped at least $80 million into an outreach plan to persuade teachers and other public union members to stop paying fair share fees. t’s a cynical, targeted and sophisticated campaign.

America’s working people are on the rise, and the Supreme Court can’t stop us. We will continue to build power to win a new set of economic rules so all of us can get ahead.

***

Posted In: From AFL-CIO, Union Matters

Union Matters

America’s Wealthy: Ever Eager to Pay Their Taxes!

Sam Pizzigati

Sam Pizzigati Editor, Too Much online magazine

Why do many of the wealthiest people in America oppose a “wealth tax,” an annual levy on grand fortune? Could their distaste reflect a simple reluctance to pay their fair tax share? Oh no, JPMorganChase CEO Jamie Dimon recently told the Business Roundtable: “I know a lot of wealthy people who would be happy to pay more in taxes; they just think it’ll be wasted and be given to interest groups and stuff like that.” Could Dimon have in mind the interest group he knows best, Wall Street? In the 2008 financial crisis, federal bailouts kept the banking industry from imploding. JPMorgan alone, notes the ProPublica Bailout Tracker, collected $25 billion worth of federal largesse, an act of generosity that’s helped Dimon lock down a $1.5-billion personal fortune. Under the Elizabeth Warren wealth tax plan, Dimon would pay an annual 3 percent tax on that much net worth. Fortunes between $1 billion and $2.5 billion would face a 5 percent annual tax under the Bernie Sanders plan.

***

More ...

No Such Thing as Good Greed

No Such Thing as Good Greed