House Republican Says Ending DACA Provides Immigrants with ‘Opportunity to Live in the Shadows’

Aaron Rupar

Aaron Rupar Reporter, ThinkProgress

During an interview with an NBC reporter on Wednesday, immigration hardliner Rep. Steve King (R-IA) offered an unusual spin on the Trump administration’s decision to end the DACA program that protects undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children, claiming it offers an “opportunity” for them “to live in the shadows.”

“They came here to live in the shadows, and we’re not denying them that opportunity to live in the shadows,” King said, in response to a question about what he expected DACA recipients to do when their authorizations expire. “They should make up their own mind.”

But the whole point of DACA was to allow young people who in many cases haven’t lived outside the U.S. to have an opportunity to live out of the shadows. The program has been effective — roughly 95 percent of the nearly 800,000 DACA recipients are either working or in school. Removing protections that allow those young adults to have jobs and pursue degrees will hurt the U.S. economy and damage DACA recipients’ mental health by throwing their future into chaos.

King, however, has previously said he thinks there are “awfully bad people” among immigrants protected under DACA, and has publicly celebrated their deportations under Trump.

King also has a history of making inflammatory comments that echo and receive praise from white nationalists.

During a CNN interview last month, King suggested DACA recipients should turn in their parents in exchange for amnesty.

“What about their parents then?” King said. “If it was against their will, then it had to be their parents who are responsible, and I’m still waiting for the first DACA recipient to say so and sign an affidavit that says, ‘I didn’t really do this on my own accord, my parents brought me in, they should have the law enforced against them, give me amnesty.’ I’m not hearing that from the DACA people.”

***

Reposted from Think Progress

Posted In: Allied Approaches

Union Matters

An Invitation to Sunny Miami. What Could Be Bad?

Sam Pizzigati

Sam Pizzigati Editor, Too Much online magazine

If a billionaire “invites” you somewhere, you’d better go. Or be prepared to suffer the consequences. This past May, hedge fund kingpin Carl Icahn announced in a letter to his New York-based staff of about 50 that he would be moving his business operations to Florida. But the 83-year-old Icahn assured his staffers they had no reason to worry: “My employees have always been very important to the company, so I’d like to invite you all to join me in Miami.” Those who go south, his letter added, would get a $50,000 relocation benefit “once you have established your permanent residence in Florida.” Those who stay put, the letter continued, can file for state unemployment benefits, a $450 weekly maximum that “you can receive for a total of 26 weeks.” What about severance from Icahn Enterprises? The New York Post reported last week that the two dozen employees who have chosen not to uproot their families and follow Icahn to Florida “will be let go without any severance” when the billionaire shutters his New York offices this coming March. Bloomberg currently puts Carl Icahn’s net worth at $20.5 billion.

***

More ...

Health Care Should Not Be A Bargaining Weapon

Health Care Should Not Be A Bargaining Weapon