House Republican Says Ending DACA Provides Immigrants with ‘Opportunity to Live in the Shadows’

Aaron Rupar

Aaron Rupar Reporter, ThinkProgress

During an interview with an NBC reporter on Wednesday, immigration hardliner Rep. Steve King (R-IA) offered an unusual spin on the Trump administration’s decision to end the DACA program that protects undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children, claiming it offers an “opportunity” for them “to live in the shadows.”

“They came here to live in the shadows, and we’re not denying them that opportunity to live in the shadows,” King said, in response to a question about what he expected DACA recipients to do when their authorizations expire. “They should make up their own mind.”

But the whole point of DACA was to allow young people who in many cases haven’t lived outside the U.S. to have an opportunity to live out of the shadows. The program has been effective — roughly 95 percent of the nearly 800,000 DACA recipients are either working or in school. Removing protections that allow those young adults to have jobs and pursue degrees will hurt the U.S. economy and damage DACA recipients’ mental health by throwing their future into chaos.

King, however, has previously said he thinks there are “awfully bad people” among immigrants protected under DACA, and has publicly celebrated their deportations under Trump.

King also has a history of making inflammatory comments that echo and receive praise from white nationalists.

During a CNN interview last month, King suggested DACA recipients should turn in their parents in exchange for amnesty.

“What about their parents then?” King said. “If it was against their will, then it had to be their parents who are responsible, and I’m still waiting for the first DACA recipient to say so and sign an affidavit that says, ‘I didn’t really do this on my own accord, my parents brought me in, they should have the law enforced against them, give me amnesty.’ I’m not hearing that from the DACA people.”

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Reposted from Think Progress

Posted In: Allied Approaches

Union Matters

Get to Know AFL-CIO's Affiliates: National Association of Letter Carriers

From the AFL-CIO

Next up in our series that takes a deeper look at each of our affiliates is the National Association of Letter Carriers.

Name of Union: National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC)

Mission: To unite fraternally all city letter carriers employed by the U.S. Postal Service for their mutual benefit; to obtain and secure rights as employees of the USPS and to strive at all times to promote the safety and the welfare of every member; to strive for the constant improvement of the Postal Service; and for other purposes. NALC is a single-craft union and is the sole collective-bargaining agent for city letter carriers.

Current Leadership of Union: Fredric V. Rolando serves as president of NALC, after being sworn in as the union's 18th president in 2009. Rolando began his career as a letter carrier in 1978 in South Miami before moving to Sarasota in 1984. He was elected president of Branch 2148 in 1988 and served in that role until 1999. In the ensuing years, he worked in various roles for NALC before winning his election as a national officer in 2002, when he was elected director of city delivery. In 2006, he won election as executive vice president. Rolando was re-elected as NALC president in 2010, 2014 and 2018.

Brian Renfroe serves as executive vice president, Lew Drass as vice president, Nicole Rhine as secretary-treasurer, Paul Barner as assistant secretary-treasurer, Christopher Jackson as director of city delivery, Manuel L. Peralta Jr. as director of safety and health, Dan Toth as director of retired members, Stephanie Stewart as director of the Health Benefit Plan and James W. “Jim” Yates as director of life insurance.

Number of Members: 291,000 active and retired letter carriers.

Members Work As: City letter carriers.

Industries Represented: The United States Postal Service.

History: In 1794, the first letter carriers were appointed by Congress as the implementation of the new U.S. Constitution was being put into effect. By the time of the Civil War, free delivery of city mail was established and letter carriers successfully concluded a campaign for the eight-hour workday in 1888. The next year, letter carriers came together in Milwaukee and the National Association of Letter Carriers was formed.

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There is Dignity in All Work

There is Dignity in All Work